We are currently closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Any orders placed on Wednesday the 23rd - November 28th will be shipped out on Monday the 29th for delivery Tuesday the 30th.

Matsutake Mushrooms, Grade #1

Perhaps the most intensely flavored edible wild mushroom in North America with earthy, spicy flavor and pine-like aroma. Prestigous mushroom, often given as gifts in Japan where it symbolizes fertility and happiness

This product is currently out of stock and unavailable.

Categories: , SKU: 120
Description
Uses & Recipes
Additional information
Reviews (0)

Description

What is a Matsutake Mushroom?

The Matsutake is one of the most highly prized wild mushrooms, as it is quite rare and grows for a short period each year. Matsutake means “pine mushroom” in Japanese, named after the evergreen forests where they are typically found. Mushroom foragers refer to them as “pines”.

Matsutake have unique aromas of pine, cedar and cinnamon, and pungent, earthy, spicy flavors.

The Matsutake mushroom is the fruit of the mycorrhizal mycelium (a fungus) that coats the roots of certain trees. The relationship is symbiotic, as they provide food for each other and the mycelium provides water for the trees.

 

Matsutake Season

On the west coast of the United States, Matsutake season runs from September through December. The temperature change in early fall stimulates the maturation process. A great deal of the harvest is exported to Japan, where the mushroom is especially revered.

 

Matsutake Mushroom Identification

In their youth, the matsutake is nearly pure white, with a tightly curled cap. The stem gets longer and darker colored as it matures, and the cap gets wider. Matsutake stems are firm throughout their entire length, and never hollow. This is key to identifying true Matsutake which are safe to eat.

Most critical to grading Matsutake is the condition of the veil, the area of the mushroom extending from the outer edge of the cap to the top of the stem.
Grade 1 Matsutake feature an unpierced veil, with overall length of at least 2.5 inches
Grade 1 Small have an unpierced veil, but are shorter than 2.5 inches
Grade 2 Matsutake have at least 50% of the veil still attached to the cap
Lesser grades have lower percentage of attached veil.

 

Matsutake Look Alikes

Beware lookalike Matsutakes, as some can be toxic. You should only purchase true Matsutake, from a licensed, trusted source.

If you squeeze the stem of the Matsutake firmly with your thumb, the stem should remain intact. If it shatters when squeezed hard, beware as it may be the highly toxic Amanita smithiana. A soft stem can also be an indicator of worms or insect larvae in a true Matsutake, in which case you should not eat the mushroom.
Further, a Matsutake stem is widest at the top, where the Amanita smithiana is widest at the bottom.

Catethelasma are another lookalike. The stem will resist pressure like a real Matsutake, but the Catathelasma feature a difficult to detect double ring and are nearly odorless.

 

Matsutake Mushroom Oregon

Wild matsutake mushrooms grow in Japan, Korea, China, in Mexico and on the west coast of North America. They are particularly prevalent in Washington state and Oregon. The small town of Chemult, Oregon is a notable base for much of the Oregon harvest.

 

Matsutake Mushroom Price

The price for fresh Matsutake mushrooms varies widely from year to year, and within each season. Weather patterns in the growing areas as well as economic conditions in the high consumption market of Japan drive price fluctuations. You can always see the current price for fresh Matsutake on our Wild Mushroom page of freshwild.com, which shows the Matsutake price including next day delivery.

 

How to Cook Matsutake Mushrooms

You can store Matsutake in the refrigerator for about a week. COVER? BAG? This is one type of mushroom where we do not advise washing.
Better to wipe down matsutakes with a damp paper towel to remove any debris;

Cut the fibrous caps and stems into thick cubes, slices, or coins to retain flavor and texture.
Matsutakes can be prepared similarly to other specialty mushrooms: steamed, sautéed, seared, roasted, grilled, or in a clear broth.

Unlike Chanterelles, Porcini, Black Trumpet and Morels, Matsutake shine brightest when prepared without cream or butter.
Gohan is a classic Japanese Matsutake dish, a simple recipe with rice and dashi where the one of a kind aroma and flavor of the Matsutake takes center stage.

 

Matsutake Recipe

Here’s how to make a simple Matsutake Soup:

Make an enhanced dashi broth by adding 1 oz dried Kombu, 1 oz dried Bonito Flakes and a pinch of Fresh & Wild Umami Powder to 2 quarts water. Heat gently until it just begins to simmer – do not let it come to a boil.

  1. Remove from heat, letting the stock stand for 5 minutes and then strain through cheesecloth or a fine mesh strainer. Return the broth to the pot and keep warm over low heat
  2. Clean 8 oz. of fresh Matsutake and slice into ⅛ inch thick slices, then score them in a criss-cross pattern with a sharp knife.
  3. Lightly coat the Matsutake with a neutral oil, then sear on a grill pan or grill on a BBQ grill over medium heat.
  4. Add the grilled Matsutake to the broth. If you want to add a few raw slices for added interest, let them warm in the broth for about 5 minutes.
  5. Garnish with thinly sliced scallions and a few sprigs of fresh parsley.

Check out the photo on this page to see our chef’s version from the Fresh & Wild test kitchen.

 

Matsutake for Sale

You can find Matsutake for sale in select farmers markets in Oregon and Washington state, as well as in gourmet Asian specialty markets. The easiest and most reliable way to buy Matsutake is to have Fresh & Wild ship them to you directly, as you will be assured of top quality fresh mushrooms, strictly sorted and graded.

How to Cook Matsutake Mushrooms

You can store Matsutake in the refrigerator for about a week. COVER? BAG? This is one type of mushroom where we do not advise washing. Better to wipe down matsutakes with a damp paper towel to remove any debris; Cut the fibrous caps and stems into thick cubes, slices, or coins to retain flavor and texture. Matsutakes can be prepared similarly to other specialty mushrooms: steamed, sautéed, seared, roasted, grilled, or in a clear broth. Unlike Chanterelles, Porcini, Black Trumpet and Morels, Matsutake shine brightest when prepared without cream or butter. Gohan is a classic Japanese Matsutake dish, a simple recipe with rice and dashi where the one of a kind aroma and flavor of the Matsutake takes center stage.  

Matsutake Recipe

Here’s how to make a simple Matsutake Soup: Make an enhanced dashi broth by adding 1 oz dried Kombu, 1 oz dried Bonito Flakes and a pinch of Fresh & Wild Umami Powder to 2 quarts water. Heat gently until it just begins to simmer - do not let it come to a boil.
  1. Remove from heat, letting the stock stand for 5 minutes and then strain through cheesecloth or a fine mesh strainer. Return the broth to the pot and keep warm over low heat
  2. Clean 8 oz. of fresh Matsutake and slice into ⅛ inch thick slices, then score them in a criss-cross pattern with a sharp knife.
  3. Lightly coat the Matsutake with a neutral oil, then sear on a grill pan or grill on a BBQ grill over medium heat.
  4. Add the grilled Matsutake to the broth. If you want to add a few raw slices for added interest, let them warm in the broth for about 5 minutes.
  5. Garnish with thinly sliced scallions and a few sprigs of fresh parsley.

Additional information

Weight 1 lbs
Shipping Speed

Ground (2-5 days), Next Day

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Matsutake Mushrooms, Grade #1”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Post comment